National Gun Violence Awareness Day and the Use of Deadly Force

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National Gun Violence Day is upon us, and it’s a poignant time to recall that gun violence touches all Americans, regardless of race, class, or gender. Every day, 93 people die from gun violence; more than half are teenagers and children. These numbers are so alarming that public health officials have long pushed for gun […]

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Why Medicaid Matters for People of Color

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Medicaid is the country’s single largest source of health care coverage, with 73 million enrollees. In 2015, almost 60% of Medicaid enrollees were people of color. It narrows the health disparities gap by providing people of color with access to health care, specifically preventative care, which prevents treatable diseases from metastasizing into chronic conditions. Due […]

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The State of Our Union’s Health Care

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The Center for Global Policy Solutions has produced a short animated video to provide the public with facts about the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and to educate them about the potential pitfalls of healthcare reform. Call your Congressional representatives today and ask them to strengthen the ACA! “Twenty-million Americans of all backgrounds have come to rely […]

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Good Health Insurance News for Latinos, Bad News for Blacks

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Newly released data on health insurance coverage from the U.S. Census Bureau shows a continued significant decline in the uninsured rate for all major racial and ethnic groups—except for African Americans. Latinos had the strongest decline between 2014 and 2015. Their uninsured rate fell 3.7 percentage points, to 17.2 percent (see figure). Still, Latinos have […]

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Baltimore’s Big Soda Moment: Why Access to Sugary Drink Information Is a Civil Rights Issue

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Baltimore’s corners are often associated with the public health threat presented by illicit drug dealing and use but there is another, more unassuming, danger lurking inside corner stores and supermarkets: sugar-sweetened beverages. The Baltimore City Council will consider a bill next week to include a warning label on sugary drinks similar to those that appear […]

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Public Housing Residents Have the Right to Manage Their Communities

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Few people know this, but public housing residents can create resident management corporations to improve their quality of life. Michael Wilson, the President of the Tenant Council and the Executive Director of the Glen Hazel community resident management corporation (in Pittsburgh, PA), explained how this works at our 2016 Color of Wealth Summit. We got consultants to train […]

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Asian Americans Could Lose the Most from an Obamacare Repeal

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Asian Americans may suffer the greatest loss in private health insurance coverage if the Affordable Care Act—Obamacare—is ended. The available data suggest that Asian Americans have obtained health insurance through the marketplaces created by Obamacare at a higher rate than other groups. Thus, if Obamacare were repealed, Asian Americans might see their dramatic gains in […]

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Obamacare Delivers Health Insurance to Low-Income Whites

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The Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, has reduced racial disparities in health insurance coverage rates between whites and people of color. I and others have discussed the historic increase in health insurance coverage for Latinos, African Americans, and Asian Americans. These findings should not obscure the fact that Obamacare has also led to […]

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Overweight Americans Have the Lowest Risk of Premature Death

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Last year the Journal of the American Medical Association released a study aiming to determine the relationship between body mass index and the risk of premature death. Body mass index, or BMI, is the ratio between your height and weight. According to the National Institutes of Health, you are “normal weight” if your ratio is […]

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