GlobalPolicy.TV - Blog Posts
 


Moriah Ray

 

With the recent ruling in the George Zimmerman case debates on race relations have filled the headlines, along with heated commentary about the future of gun control legislation. Florida resident, George Zimmerman, was found not guilty of the murder of 17 year old Trayvon Martin after pleading self defense. Zimmerman’s lawyers argued that under the Stand Your Ground laws of Florida Zimmerman was completely justified in shooting the unarmed teen. This incident has fueled a great deal of controversy over the legitimacy of Stand Your Ground and gun control laws in the United States as a whole. Nationally, the Zimmerman trial has managed to push gun control back to the forefront of public policy discussions.

Friday, July 19 2013 10:16
 


Spotlight

Navasha Daya is a singer, songwriter, producer, and spiritual and cultural arts activist, who from childhood was inspired and encouraged to use her voice and talents for upliftment and change. Steadfast in her dedication to the upliftment of the community, she along with Fanon Hill and youth mentees Rashard Willliams and Cherdaya Allen, co-founded the Baltimore City Youth Resiliency Institute, now the Youth Resiliency Institute (YRI).

Wednesday, July 17 2013 11:38
 


Lisa Wade, Ph.D.

Last week the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the part of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that required states with a documenting history of discrimination to get federal approval before changing their voting laws.  When the law was passed in 1965, one of its main targets were “literacy tests.”

Tuesday, July 02 2013 10:36
 


Moriah Ray

The Supreme Court struck down a fundamental civil rights section of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, this past Tuesday, June 25. Section 4 determines which states must gain federal permission before they alter any of their voting laws. It was specifically created to protect the voting right’s of African- Americans in the South. The passing of the Voting Rights Act was a monumental civil rights victory for African Americans, especially for civil rights leaders like Martin Luther King Jr., who worked tirelessly to ensure the laws passing.

Friday, June 28 2013 09:46
 


Madhu Vulimiri

Last Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a decision in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, concerning the constitutionality of the University of Texas at Austin’s (UT) admissions policy. In a 7-1 majority opinion, the Court ruled to preserve the principle that universities may consider racial and ethnic diversity as one factor among many in a carefully crafted admissions policy.

Thursday, June 27 2013 12:28
 


Moriah Ray

Immigration reform is an often-debated issue at the local, state and federal level, and there are many differing opinions on how to best deal with undocumented immigrants. But it seems that immigration reform is finally making progress with the latest immigration bill passing its first procedural hurdle on the Senate floor Tuesday, June 11 in a 82-15 vote.

Wednesday, June 19 2013 15:21
 


U.S. Rep. Barbara Lee

Why would Members of Congress commit to spend only $4.50 a day on food and live on the budget of the average SNAP recipient? The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (formerly called Food Stamps), is an essential lifeline that helps put food on the table for 47 million hungry Americans, and it is under fire.

Wednesday, June 12 2013 16:06
 


Madhu Vulimiri

The Institute for America’s Future and the Opportunity to Learn Campaign have joined a diverse group of education advocates to release an “Education Declaration” that demands a new direction in public school policy, focused on opportunities and supports for students – and respect for teachers.

Wednesday, June 12 2013 16:00