GlobalPolicy.TV - Other Blog Items
 


Lisa Wade, Ph.D.

Last week the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the part of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 that required states with a documenting history of discrimination to get federal approval before changing their voting laws.  When the law was passed in 1965, one of its main targets were “literacy tests.”

Tuesday, July 02 2013 10:36
 


Moriah Ray

The Supreme Court struck down a fundamental civil rights section of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, this past Tuesday, June 25. Section 4 determines which states must gain federal permission before they alter any of their voting laws. It was specifically created to protect the voting right’s of African- Americans in the South. The passing of the Voting Rights Act was a monumental civil rights victory for African Americans, especially for civil rights leaders like Martin Luther King Jr., who worked tirelessly to ensure the laws passing.

Friday, June 28 2013 09:46
 


Madhu Vulimiri

Last Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a decision in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, concerning the constitutionality of the University of Texas at Austin’s (UT) admissions policy. In a 7-1 majority opinion, the Court ruled to preserve the principle that universities may consider racial and ethnic diversity as one factor among many in a carefully crafted admissions policy.

Thursday, June 27 2013 12:28
 


Moriah Ray

Immigration reform is an often-debated issue at the local, state and federal level, and there are many differing opinions on how to best deal with undocumented immigrants. But it seems that immigration reform is finally making progress with the latest immigration bill passing its first procedural hurdle on the Senate floor Tuesday, June 11 in a 82-15 vote.

Wednesday, June 19 2013 15:21
 


Madhu Vulimiri

The Institute for America’s Future and the Opportunity to Learn Campaign have joined a diverse group of education advocates to release an “Education Declaration” that demands a new direction in public school policy, focused on opportunities and supports for students – and respect for teachers.

Wednesday, June 12 2013 16:00
 


Lisa Wade, Ph.D.

Most of us familiar with Down‘s Syndrome know that it brings characteristic facial features and delayed or impaired cognitive development. People with Down, however, are also more vulnerable than the general population to diabetes, leukemia, and infectious and autoimmune disease, and about 40% are born with heart defects.

Wednesday, June 12 2013 09:35
 


Madhu Vulimiri

The concept of a “path to citizenship” might be more than just a hopeful buzzword for Latino immigrants. It may be the path to reducing economic disparities for the growing population of Latinos in the United States.

Tuesday, June 11 2013 15:44
 


Terri Wright

When asked by a potential community partner what was the one thing that could be done to improve the health of its citizens, Dr. Adewale Troutman, the then newly appointed director for Louisville’s health department* answered, “to make sure that everyone graduates from high school”.  Like many others, the community partner wondered - what does high school graduation have to do with health?

Monday, June 10 2013 13:05