Good Health Insurance News for Latinos, Bad News for Blacks

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Newly released data on health insurance coverage from the U.S. Census Bureau shows a continued significant decline in the uninsured rate for all major racial and ethnic groups—except for African Americans. Latinos had the strongest decline between 2014 and 2015. Their uninsured rate fell 3.7 percentage points, to 17.2 percent (see figure). Still, Latinos have […]

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Shamefully High Child Poverty Rates In the United States

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Despite being a very rich country, the United States has a very high child poverty rate, many times higher than the rate in other rich countries. Since “poverty” can be defined differently in each country, UNICEF uses a relative poverty standard for international comparisons of child poverty. By this standard, children living in households earning […]

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Unmarried Women and the Latino Middle Class Struggle Most with Emergency Expenses

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While the official poverty rate is a very useful measure, it misses important dimensions of economic hardship. Earlier this year, an article, “The Secret Shame of Middle-Class Americans,” by Neal Gabler in The Atlantic highlighted the fact that many Americans—including those in the middle class—do not have $400 on hand to cover an emergency expense. […]

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Hidden Challenges for Black Women Entrepreneurs

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Although Black women’s firms appear to be doing very well when looked at from afar, upon closer examination, problems become apparent. In 2015, American Express OPEN reported that firms owned by African American women had the strongest rate of growth in number and revenue among women-owned firms. Looking more carefully at the American Express OPEN […]

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Black Men Entrepreneurs Were Walloped by the Great Recession

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In comparison to firms owned by other race and gender groups of business owners, Black men’s firms were hit hardest by the Great Recession. Of the 10 such groups analyzed in the report, “The Color of Entrepreneurship,” only African American men had a decline in their number of businesses from 2007 through 2012. Black men’s […]

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Asian Americans Could Lose the Most from an Obamacare Repeal

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Asian Americans may suffer the greatest loss in private health insurance coverage if the Affordable Care Act—Obamacare—is ended. The available data suggest that Asian Americans have obtained health insurance through the marketplaces created by Obamacare at a higher rate than other groups. Thus, if Obamacare were repealed, Asian Americans might see their dramatic gains in […]

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Obamacare Delivers Health Insurance to Low-Income Whites

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The Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, has reduced racial disparities in health insurance coverage rates between whites and people of color. I and others have discussed the historic increase in health insurance coverage for Latinos, African Americans, and Asian Americans. These findings should not obscure the fact that Obamacare has also led to […]

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The Poverty-Fighting Power of Social Security

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American society is better off with less poverty and less of the many social problems associated with poverty. Social Security is our strongest poverty-fighting program; therefore our leaders should act to keep the program strong. Of the programs existing today, none compare to Social Security in its ability to reduce the national poverty rate. The […]

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The Best Anti-Poverty Program Is a Good Job

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This week, we will once again see that the Latino and African American poverty rates are more than double the non-Hispanic white poverty rate. The persistence of high poverty rates among these two groups can lead one to think that there are no policy options to address this problem, but this is not the case. We […]

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Connecting Alaska to the Gulf Coast and to Racial Wealth Inequality

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by Algernon Austin This week, President Obama was in Alaska to call attention for the need for global action on climate change. Last week, he was in New Orleans commemorating the tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. While Alaska is 4,000 miles away from Louisiana, both states face similar challenges from climate change. And, in both […]

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