America’s Zero Moment

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One of the most riveting narratives released in recent weeks was not a tweet issued by the president elect, but a transcript chronicling the tragic final hours of 33 crew members who died on the El Faro, a merchant ship that sank in the midst of Hurricane Joaquin near the Bahamas in October of 2015. […]

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Good Health Insurance News for Latinos, Bad News for Blacks

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Newly released data on health insurance coverage from the U.S. Census Bureau shows a continued significant decline in the uninsured rate for all major racial and ethnic groups—except for African Americans. Latinos had the strongest decline between 2014 and 2015. Their uninsured rate fell 3.7 percentage points, to 17.2 percent (see figure). Still, Latinos have […]

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Shamefully High Child Poverty Rates In the United States

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Despite being a very rich country, the United States has a very high child poverty rate, many times higher than the rate in other rich countries. Since “poverty” can be defined differently in each country, UNICEF uses a relative poverty standard for international comparisons of child poverty. By this standard, children living in households earning […]

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Unmarried Women and the Latino Middle Class Struggle Most with Emergency Expenses

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While the official poverty rate is a very useful measure, it misses important dimensions of economic hardship. Earlier this year, an article, “The Secret Shame of Middle-Class Americans,” by Neal Gabler in The Atlantic highlighted the fact that many Americans—including those in the middle class—do not have $400 on hand to cover an emergency expense. […]

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Hidden Challenges for Black Women Entrepreneurs

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Although Black women’s firms appear to be doing very well when looked at from afar, upon closer examination, problems become apparent. In 2015, American Express OPEN reported that firms owned by African American women had the strongest rate of growth in number and revenue among women-owned firms. Looking more carefully at the American Express OPEN […]

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Second Amendment Rights: Not Applicable for Black People

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On the Fourth of July, Dr. Maya Rockeymoore, president, CEO, and founder of the Center for Global Policy Solutions, tackled the reality of our country’s exclusionary Declaration of Independence in her op-ed, “A Declaration of Inclusion on Independence Day.” But, in the following days, we were reminded yet again that the “inalienable rights” our country’s […]

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Black Men Entrepreneurs Were Walloped by the Great Recession

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In comparison to firms owned by other race and gender groups of business owners, Black men’s firms were hit hardest by the Great Recession. Of the 10 such groups analyzed in the report, “The Color of Entrepreneurship,” only African American men had a decline in their number of businesses from 2007 through 2012. Black men’s […]

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Baltimore’s Big Soda Moment: Why Access to Sugary Drink Information Is a Civil Rights Issue

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Baltimore’s corners are often associated with the public health threat presented by illicit drug dealing and use but there is another, more unassuming, danger lurking inside corner stores and supermarkets: sugar-sweetened beverages. The Baltimore City Council will consider a bill next week to include a warning label on sugary drinks similar to those that appear […]

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