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Why Medicaid Matters for People of Color

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Medicaid is the country’s single largest source of health care coverage, with 73 million enrollees. In 2015, almost 60% of Medicaid enrollees were people of color. It narrows the health disparities gap by providing people of color with access to health care, specifically preventative care, which prevents treatable diseases from metastasizing into chronic conditions. Due […]

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Washington’s Big Risk: Ignoring the Rise of Automation

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Last month, Tesla announced a partnership with the country of Dubai to put 200 driverless taxis on the road. The fact that Tesla and other Silicon Valley companies, like Uber and Google, are focusing heavily on research and development of artificial intelligence and automated technology comes as no surprise. Yet, what is surprising is the lack of […]

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The State of Our Union’s Health Care

The Center for Global Policy Solutions has produced a short animated video to provide the public with facts about the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and to educate them about the potential pitfalls of healthcare reform. Call your Congressional representatives today and ask them to strengthen the ACA! “Twenty-million Americans of all backgrounds have come to rely […]

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America’s Zero Moment

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One of the most riveting narratives released in recent weeks was not a tweet issued by the president elect, but a transcript chronicling the tragic final hours of 33 crew members who died on the El Faro, a merchant ship that sank in the midst of Hurricane Joaquin near the Bahamas in October of 2015. […]

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Congressman Ted Lieu on Why Representation for People of Color Is Important

  In conversation with Ray Suarez at our 2016 Color of Wealth Summit, Congressman Ted Lieu talked about what made him realize why lack of representation for people of color should in leadership positions is a problem: When I was a state legislator I worked on issues related to foundations and found out that they gave less money to […]

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Good Health Insurance News for Latinos, Bad News for Blacks

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Newly released data on health insurance coverage from the U.S. Census Bureau shows a continued significant decline in the uninsured rate for all major racial and ethnic groups—except for African Americans. Latinos had the strongest decline between 2014 and 2015. Their uninsured rate fell 3.7 percentage points, to 17.2 percent (see figure). Still, Latinos have […]

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Shamefully High Child Poverty Rates In the United States

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Despite being a very rich country, the United States has a very high child poverty rate, many times higher than the rate in other rich countries. Since “poverty” can be defined differently in each country, UNICEF uses a relative poverty standard for international comparisons of child poverty. By this standard, children living in households earning […]

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Unmarried Women and the Latino Middle Class Struggle Most with Emergency Expenses

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While the official poverty rate is a very useful measure, it misses important dimensions of economic hardship. Earlier this year, an article, “The Secret Shame of Middle-Class Americans,” by Neal Gabler in The Atlantic highlighted the fact that many Americans—including those in the middle class—do not have $400 on hand to cover an emergency expense. […]

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Hidden Challenges for Black Women Entrepreneurs

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Although Black women’s firms appear to be doing very well when looked at from afar, upon closer examination, problems become apparent. In 2015, American Express OPEN reported that firms owned by African American women had the strongest rate of growth in number and revenue among women-owned firms. Looking more carefully at the American Express OPEN […]

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